Interview With Kenzie Slottow: Ableton Live Looping

Today we’re excited to catch up with flutist and composer Kenzie Slottow, to discuss life and upcoming events and projects.  Not only does Kenzie compose amazing music, she does it in a unique way utilizing Ableton Live’s looping capabilities.  She is also a student of Ableton certified instructor, Jimmy Allison.  We’re glad to present to you this recent interview:

AAT: What are some of your biggest influences musically?

KS: Lindsey Stirling– she plays violin to original dubstep, house, electro-pop, and all sorts of EDM. I’d never heard anyone put a classical instrument in that context. And she dances while she plays, which is amazingly difficult.  Her videography is really inspiring to me too. Zoe Keating, she used to play with the band Raspertina, and then she started doing cello looping in a really intricate way, using Ableton and some other software.  She’s a tech person by trade.  Her music is really heartfelt, and it transports you, very evocative.

AAT: How has that inspired your playing?

KS: Zoe made me want to loop. I was discouraged by the limitations of looping at first, and when I heard her music I learned there could be complexity and beauty in it. Lindsey showed me you can move and play your instrument, and since dance is a big part of my background, I saw they could both be done at the same time, and I immediately wanted to incorporate that. Also Lindsey’s music is very energetic and upbeat, and it appeals to a wide demographic of people. I really like her melodies as well.

AAT: How long have you been playing music?

KS: There’s a picture of me sitting with my dad, and singing while he plays guitar, and I look I’m about five. But I started playing flute when I was in 5th grade, so about 17 years.

AAT: Have you been playing the entire time since then?

KS:Yeah.

AAT: When you compose, do you write from the flute, or another instrument?

KS: I’ll sound out the melody in my head onto the flute; sometimes I’ll sing it into a voice memo and sound it out later. Usually I have a vision of the atmosphere I want to create before I even create the melody. I kind of go from big to small. Like “I want to write a love song” or “I want to write a song about being nervous”, which luckily for me translates into something original-sounding every time, because it’s flute and instrumental, without any lyrics.

AAT: How long does it typically take to compose a song?

KS: The songs on the dance EP were conceived in many different versions. So from the first to the final iteration, two of them were at least 6 months. You probably wouldn’t recognize the songs from the first to the last versions. It depends on a lot of things, I can’t really choose how long it takes. It comes from somewhere else, and I need to allow it to come through, without the mind trying to figure it out. It’s something I’m trying to work on, getting more spiritual about something I want to do rationally, and on a schedule.

AAT: How have you noticed that your music’s changed over years?

KS: I started out excited to learn the band and orchestra music in high school, and in college I continued to be passionate about classical music but discovered that there was a flutist in England composing jazzy contemporary stuff, that was notated, and I could read it and learn it. I didn’t have a jazz background, so I needed the notation. Ian Clarke is his name. And that was my introduction into playing non-classical. I asked an older classmate to teach me one of Ian’s pieces. It had almost beat-box type percussive stuff in it, you had to yell in the middle of it and make really dirty flute sounds. So, I loved it! And throughout college I learned Irish flute, and a little bit of North Indian Hindustani flute, and I really enjoyed combining all of the genres I was finding out about. So by senior year, I put together an arrangement using pretty much all three of those, Irish, Indian and Classical. This was unorthodox for a last piece for music school! In grad school at University of Texas, I was introduced to Electro-Acoustic composition; so that’s when I developed an interest in combining electronic sounds with flute. My style has expanded over the past seven years with all that I’ve learned about, and it keeps expanding.

AAT: So that got you into looping?

KS: Yeah, I didn’t know how to use the technology that those composers were using, so I started with a BOSS RC30, because it was much simpler.

AAT: What got you into learning Ableton?

KS: Once I had written several songs with the RC-30 I felt I had reached the limits of that hardware. So, I wanted to be able to take the pieces being recorded, and make them go away and allow them to come back at the end. On the RC-30 if you erase something there’s no bringing it back, unless you switch to another memory track which is tedious. So on Ableton you could do a lot more complex arranging, and it was designed for live performance. Not only would I be able to bring things back, but I could automate panning, volume levels, effects, and I could choose what each foot pedal did on my controller.

AAT: Have you found that using Ableton has changed the nature of your compositions?

KS: Yes. In the studio, making the Hold It Up To The Sun Loops EP, we were basically composing with individual segments instead of live in the studio, because I didn’t know how to use Ableton yet. But we were putting the pieces together in a way that could only be done on Ableton. I wanted to make sure the stuff on the CD could be done live, so the capabilities of the software were really important in creating the songs that way. I was able to give my songs a dramatic arch that was dependent on a lot of expressive techniques, like fading out the first rhythm while it’s overlaid with a different rhythm; like having certain sections play only from the right or left. Really specific details. I know there are a million hardware looping options out there, but I just couldn’t afford all of that, and with Ableton I knew if I got it once then the sky’s the limit, and the hardware would eventually reach a limit, where I would have to turn to the computer anyways.

Kenzie_Slottow_Ableton_Live_Looping

AAT: How long did it take to learn all of that?

KS: I’ve been working on this for about a year, and I now know just enough to make the songs on my album work, and we’re still improving them. I’m looking forward to the moment when I feel like the software is my creative playground.

AAT: Jimmy Allison is your Ableton instructor, how has the experience been, learning with him?

KS: I wouldn’t have been able to do any of this without Jimmy. When I first looked at the program it was like a foreign language. I go into Jimmy and I say I want to recreate this song live, it has 24 recorded segments and some of them fade out and come back later, some of them simplify and reappear in their original form, and some of them I want to sample for later in the song. And Jimmy says “Hmmm, I’ve never heard of that before, but let’s try this.” and then he figures it out in 10 or 20 minutes and creates a structure for doing this. And so slowly I’m assimilating this and understanding it, while in the meantime, it’s already happening. I can hear it, I can play it.

AAT: Has he been able to help you learn everything you wanted to learn?

KS: Yeah and more. As I get into my music, he keeps coming up with more ideas for how to make the live sound better. What equipment I might try, like in-ear monitors, and he even helps me with other aspects like an automated scheduling system that has simplified my life! He’s definitely a really holistic teacher and you get more than you expect.

AAT: So you have an album that is about it be released?

KS: Its called Hold It Up To The Sun, and there are two EPs under that name. The Loops EP is the all of the stuff I’ve been working with Jimmy on in Ableton. It’s layers of flute, beat-box, vocals, that I try to tell stories with. They range from really meditative to rock and roll to techno, and to almost comical lyrics. It’s mostly instrumental, with one song of lyrics. The Dance EP is shorter and the electronics were produced ahead of time. They’re lush backtracks with epic beats, and soaring melodies. I literally cannot stand still and play these songs at the same time. It’s being released on October 10th, 2015 at the North Door. Right now it’s available for pre-order on my Kickstarter.

AAT: Tell me about the Kickstarter.

KS: The Kickstarter is both a way to raise money to create the two EP’s, and sharing my first batch of original music with the world. I’m raising $8,000, it started on Labor Day and is continuing until October 7th. I’m offering not only the EP’s, but also T-shirts, remixes and preliminary versions of some of the tracks, for different levels of backing on Kickstarter. People can get the albums and a shirt for $25, and with $35 will also get two tickets to the album release party. At the door they’ll be $10 each.
Also on the Kickstarter page you can find the history behind the album’s title, and read about how this music can inspire children to be more creative.   [Kenzie’s Kickstarter can be found here: http://kck.st/1ODAM26 ]

AAT: Can you say anything more about the Release party?

KS: It’s going to be a very collaborative show. I have at least two dancers I’m going to be working with, three talented band members, and two great videographers,
to make this show a full sensory experience. It’s appropriate for all ages. In addition to playing the full two EP’s, I’m going to be doing covers of some of my biggest influences. There will be guest appearances as well. The vibe is going to be similar to a previous show I put at the Butterfly Bar in 2012 and 2014 called Disco Classical where we had a variety of musicians playing dance music in different styles. People were grooving, dancing or just enjoying themselves the entire night. I’m really looking to recreate that energy, but this time with my original music.

AAT: What time is the show on the 10th?

KS: Doors are at 7:30, Nicholas Azlon of MODAL will be performing at 8, and my set starts at 9. There will be an after party of beat boxing and jams by Maestro Giovani starting at 10:30, in the same location. Tickets are $8 on the North Door website, $10 at the door.

Here is a link to tickets for the show at the North Door: http://northdoor.queueapp.com/events/14700

http://www.facebook.com/events/171634103173831/ , http://www.kenzieslottow.com/ , http://www.instagram.com/kenzieslottow

This concludes our interview.  Stay tuned for more Interviews, Updates, and Tips.

Ableton Live Certified Trainer

Click here For information
about private lessons, webinars, and classes on Ableton Live and more

 

Read more

Using and Recoding Automation in Ableton Live 9

Using and Recording Automation in Ableton Live 9

This Ableton Instruction video by Ableton Live Certified Trainer Jimmy Allison is about using and recording automation in Ableton Live 9. Automation is a very handy tool that can be utilized for both production and performance. New to Ableton Live 9 is the ability to record Automation directly into Live’s session view clips. You can also move clips between session view and arrangement view while maintaining the automation . This video also contains a tips for over dubbing Automation with the Ableton Push and a workflow tip involving using automation on the Ableton utility effect.

 

Over Dubbing Automation in Arrangement view with Ableton Push

This is video is just a quick video to show you how to overdub Automation in Ableton Live using Ableton Push. It can be a bit tricky but basically you need to set the input to non on the track so that the Ableton Push does not arm the track when you select. If the track is armed and you try to record Automation int0 Live’s arrangement view you will also overdub the midi clip. This is a just a quick video demonstrating how to set up Ableton Live’s Arrangement View for overdubbing automation with the Ableton Push.

Jimmy Allison is an Ableton Live Certified training offering private and group lesson online and in the Austin, TX area. Taking private lessons is one of the most cost effective ways of attaining your goals. The lessons will be focused on you and your needs which will greatly reduce your learning curve. Learn at your pace and on your own time. Highly specialized training from an instructor with over 7 years of experience teaching and countless years producing and performing music. Feel free to send a message and receive more info about Ableton Training

Ableton Live Automation

Read more

Error: Please enter a valid email address

Error: Invalid email

Error: Please enter your first name

Error: Please enter your last name

Error: Please enter a username

Error: Please enter a password

Error: Please confirm your password

Error: Password and password confirmation do not match